Flavors of Portugal And Spain

7 Nights of Iconic Cities & Mountain Villages

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Two iconic cities, Lisbon and Madrid, provide the perfect start and end to a grand journey through Portugal and Spain. Choose to add pre-cruise nights in Lisbon or post-cruise nights in Madrid to take full advantage of your journey.

Petite-France in Strasbourg is known for its cobblestone streets, canals, Alsatian eateries, and lively shops. 

Old World

And Treasured New Discoveries

Set sail on your river cruise from Porto, the beautiful “City of Bridges” and gateway to the Douro River Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with rambling vineyards and charming quintas, which cling to the steep banks of the river. Taste wines from these vineyards and disccover the timeless tradition of Portuguese winemaking throughout your journey before visiting some of Spain’s glorious cities: the golden-hued city of Salamancca, the anccient walled city of Toledo, and the seaside town of Sintra, one of the loveliest mountain villages in Portugal and a favorite summer residence of the Portuguese royal family for over 500 years. 

The medieval walls of Reichsburg Cochem’s Imperial Castle overlook a mighty crag over the Moselle River Valley. 

Daily Itinerary

This day-to-day schedule is subject to change. Your final day-to-day schedule will be provided onboard on the first day of your cruise.

Day 1 - Land Tour: Lisbon

The hodgepodge of historical periods and cultures represented in Lisbon, Portugal, is a major source of its charm and travel appeal. A sprawling city on the banks of the Tagus River, Lisbon constantly reminds travelers that Portugal has been conquered several times, that it developed (and lost) its own illustrious empire and that, for much of the 20th century, it isolated itself from the rest of the world.

As visitors to Portugal walk Lisbon’s hills—or, better, take one of Lisbon’s vintage trams—they’ll find restored medieval facades, wonderful art-nouveau buildings, black-and-white mosaic sidewalks (known as calcada), fine museums and plenty of modern shops.

Lisbon’s citizens seem to have absorbed their city’s many-sided character. Visitors can witness the popularity of fado, the melancholy music that developed in Lisbon in the early-19th century. Though the performers sing about tragedy and distant glory, the audience is very much a part of modern Lisbon—a flourishing, fashionable business and leisure center.

 

Day 1 - Porto

Porto, Portugal’s second-largest city, sits on the steep north bank of the Douro River. It has an interesting port area and a charming, old-world feel to it, especially among the ocher and brown tenements stacked high on the slopes above the river. Porto’s history predates the Roman occupation—in fact, Portugal took its name from the town.

Porto has undergone many transformations in the new millenium, including the opening of a photography museum (housed in a 19th-century prison) and an orchestra hall. The urban regeneration has reached the Ribeira area, where scores of trendy cafes and restaurants as well as quality souvenir and craft shops have sprung up. Porto is a vibrant and increasingly cosmopolitan city.

Day 2 - Porto

Porto, Portugal’s second-largest city, sits on the steep north bank of the Douro River. It has an interesting port area and a charming, old-world feel to it, especially among the ocher and brown tenements stacked high on the slopes above the river. Porto’s history predates the Roman occupation—in fact, Portugal took its name from the town.

Porto has undergone many transformations in the new millenium, including the opening of a photography museum (housed in a 19th-century prison) and an orchestra hall. The urban regeneration has reached the Ribeira area, where scores of trendy cafes and restaurants as well as quality souvenir and craft shops have sprung up. Porto is a vibrant and increasingly cosmopolitan city.

 

 

Day 3 - Porto

 

Porto, Portugal’s second-largest city, sits on the steep north bank of the Douro River. It has an interesting port area and a charming, old-world feel to it, especially among the ocher and brown tenements stacked high on the slopes above the river. Porto’s history predates the Roman occupation—in fact, Portugal took its name from the town.

Porto has undergone many transformations in the new millenium, including the opening of a photography museum (housed in a 19th-century prison) and an orchestra hall. The urban regeneration has reached the Ribeira area, where scores of trendy cafes and restaurants as well as quality souvenir and craft shops have sprung up. Porto is a vibrant and increasingly cosmopolitan city.

 

Day 3 (Part 2) - Entre-Os-Rios

Entre-Os-Rios is a small town located at the confluence of the Douro and Tamega Rivers. Enjoy magnificent views of vineyards and fruit trees, and utter relaxation while strolling through this charming town.

 

Day 4 - Lamego

Lamego is an ancient episcopal city lying within the Upper Douro’s demarcated Port wine area, with one of Portugal’s most important shrines overlooking the city. Located in a fertile valley, it is a delightful Baroque town with a central square laid out as a public garden surrounded by elegant 17th-century buildings. Its most significant role in the country’s history was as the site where, in 1143, the cortes met for the very first time to declare Afonso Henriques as Portugal’s first king.

Day 4 (Part 2) - Mateus

Mateus is a charming portuguese village, which owes its fame to the nobility of the region. Visitors may visit the Mateus palace and view the baroque architecture, valuable paintings, and small private museum. There are also beautiful gardens for visitors to admire and enjoy. Mateus is also known for its wine industry and produces a variety of wines showcasing  the Mateus palace on the face of the unique bottle.

Day 4 (Part 3) - Pinhao

Spectacularly located at the confluence of the Douro and Pinhão rivers, the small town of Pinhão is the epicenter of the Port winemaking area. Although a sleepy town for most of the year, Pinhão bursts into life in autumn during the annual grape harvest, attracting pickers from all over the country. Popular for its peaceful riverside location and surrounding scenery, Pinhão is a mecca for lovers of fine wine. Built on the site of an 18th century wine estate, the four-star Vintage House Hotel operates regular tastings and courses covering a wide range of aspects, such as the main types, how the wine is made and buying and storing. The railway line passes within view of some of the most famous Port vineyards. Croft’s Quinta da Roeda, Graham’s Quinta dos Malvedos and Cockburn’s Tua are all within sight of the train. Further along are two of the grandest of vineyard estates: Taylor’s Quinta de Vargellas and the Symingtons’ Quinta do Vesúvio, both of which have their own private railway stations.

Day 5 - Pinhao

Spectacularly located at the confluence of the Douro and Pinhão rivers, the small town of Pinhão is the epicenter of the Port winemaking area. Although a sleepy town for most of the year, Pinhão bursts into life in autumn during the annual grape harvest, attracting pickers from all over the country. Popular for its peaceful riverside location and surrounding scenery, Pinhão is a mecca for lovers of fine wine. Built on the site of an 18th century wine estate, the four-star Vintage House Hotel operates regular tastings and courses covering a wide range of aspects, such as the main types, how the wine is made and buying and storing. The railway line passes within view of some of the most famous Port vineyards. Croft’s Quinta da Roeda, Graham’s Quinta dos Malvedos and Cockburn’s Tua are all within sight of the train. Further along are two of the grandest of vineyard estates: Taylor’s Quinta de Vargellas and the Symingtons’ Quinta do Vesúvio, both of which have their own private railway stations.

Day 6 - Pinhao

Spectacularly located at the confluence of the Douro and Pinhão rivers, the small town of Pinhão is the epicenter of the Port winemaking area. Although a sleepy town for most of the year, Pinhão bursts into life in autumn during the annual grape harvest, attracting pickers from all over the country. Popular for its peaceful riverside location and surrounding scenery, Pinhão is a mecca for lovers of fine wine. Built on the site of an 18th century wine estate, the four-star Vintage House Hotel operates regular tastings and courses covering a wide range of aspects, such as the main types, how the wine is made and buying and storing. The railway line passes within view of some of the most famous Port vineyards. Croft’s Quinta da Roeda, Graham’s Quinta dos Malvedos and Cockburn’s Tua are all within sight of the train. Further along are two of the grandest of vineyard estates: Taylor’s Quinta de Vargellas and the Symingtons’ Quinta do Vesúvio, both of which have their own private railway stations.

Day 7 - Vega de Terrón

Venture to Castelo Rodrigo, known as the “White Village” because of its abundant almond trees. The site offers spectacular views of the surrounding area, with Spain visible in the distance. Join a walking tour through its medieval streets and see the houses and establishments with 16th century facades and Manueline style windows. Be sure to make stops to sample the local favorites, including cheese, almonds, bread, and wine. 

Day 8 - Vega de Terrón

Venture to Castelo Rodrigo, known as the “White Village” because of its abundant almond trees. The site offers spectacular views of the surrounding area, with Spain visible in the distance. Join a walking tour through its medieval streets and see the houses and establishments with 16th century facades and Manueline style windows. Be sure to make stops to sample the local favorites, including cheese, almonds, bread, and wine. 

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